BLACK EDGE
A PHOTOGRAPHIC WALKING WEBSITE by NEIL HASLEWOOD
Black Edge - 15th September 2007
WALK STATISTICS
Date 15th September 2007 Description Black Edge
Start Point Corbar Road Peaks Climbed Corbar Hill 437m
Total Time 4hrs 46min   Black Edge 507m
Walking Time 3hrs 48min    
Stopped Time 0hrs 58min    
Distance 9.83 miles    
Moving Average 2.6 mph Pressure 1023.5mb
Elevation at Start 343 metres Temperature 17°C
Total Ascent 475 metres Weather Cloudy start then sunny intervals
Max Elevation 507 metres Walking With No One
WALK NOTES

Corbar Road (Buxton) - Corbar Woods- Corbar Hill - Flint Clough - Black Edge - Hob Tor - Short Edge - Castle Naze - Combs Edge - Midshires Way - Corbar Road (Buxton)

On what looked like a promising day for weather I travelled to Buxton to start a walk in part of Derbyshire I had not visited before. I parked my car on Corbar Road in Buxton (a quiet road with plenty of roadside parking) just off the A5004 - Buxton to Whaley Bridge. The start of the walk is along a lane next to Corbar Hall marked "Corbar Woods - Private Lane". After a very short distance one enters Corbar Woods through a brightly coloured entrance on the right. There then is a short but steep ascent up through the woods before turning left along side a wall to a stile which gives access to the top of Corbar Hill. At the summit there is a trig point and a huge cross (which can be seen for miles around). Corbar Cross dates back to 1950 and was presented to the Roman Catholic Church by the Duke of Devonshire.

Leaving Corbar Hill there is a thin grass path leading westerly towards Moss House Farm. Then at the corner of a wood pass through a gate, turn north alongside the left-hand side of a fence to another stile. Turn north west following a path towards the farm then cross a stream (you will need to find the best place to cross - could be boggy at certain times). Then it's north north east uphill to a break in the wall with a makeshift small gate. Cross the wall here onto the Open Access land. Next follow the wall north east towards Black Edge along a good walkers path through the grass and heather. Very soon Flint Clough is reached where the path heads upstream for about 150 metres to cross the stream before heading back to follow the edge again. Eventually Black Edge Summit Trig Point is reached. This is the highest point of the walk at 507 metres. There are good views all around including Mam Tor and Kinder Scout.

From Black Edge Summit the route continues to Hob Tor and Short Edge. There is a choice of paths here - follow the edge or cut across the moor. Both paths merge again further on. I took the path across the moor for a change of scenery but I suggest if the weather is not too good follow the path next to the edge. The path then crosses a stile (looked very new) and heads towards Castle Naze where there is a ancient fort. From the fort cross another stile. Soon you will notice a path which heads steeply down towards the valley bottom - ignore this and follow the path along the edge. At this point Combs Edge is arrived at. There were some climbers on the edge today practicing their skills. Ladder Hill with it's OS pillar and communication mast can clearly be seen across the valley.

The route then continues by following the thin (but clear) path along the edges back to Midshires Way. Several small streams are crossed including Pygreave Brook, and three tributaries of Meveril Brook (followed by another tributary of Meveril Brook further on). The views along the edge are lovely down into the Combs Valley and on to Kinder Scout in the distance. About half way along the route back (which contours around the valley) there is a Shooting Hut which is quite distinctive on the rocky edge. I presume that this hut is used in the Grouse season. It is locked and bolted so no entry is allowed in here. However there is also a small stone shelter nearby which may be entered in bad weather. Eventually the path veers left following a boundary wall (do not cross the boken wall at this point) and heads uphill for a short distance. After 250 metres the wall turns left. Our path turns right here and descends steeply down into the valley below. A couple of stiles are crossed to reach the Midshires Way. Here is the Outdoor Pursuits Centre of White Hall. The final leg of the route continues along the Midshires Way and the A5004 back to Corbar Road in Buxton. This was a very enjoyable walk in a particular quiet part of the Peak District.

MAP
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PROFILE
REFERENCE

Reference Books Used

Peak District Trigpointing Walks by Keith Stevens & Peter Whittaker (Sigma Leisure)
Maps Used
OL24 Explorer - The Peak District (White Peak Area)
PHOTOGRAPHS
Walking up through Corbar Woods
Corbar Hill with part of Buxton and Axe Edge
Corbar Hill Trig Point
Corbar Cross
Corbar Hill Cross & Trig Point
Moss House Farm from Corbar Hill
Looking back to Corbar Hill
Start of path to Black Edge
Crossing Flint Clough
Looking to Corbar Hill from near Flint Clough
Near Flint Clough
Near Flint Clough
Black Edge and Dove Holes
Black Edge Summit Trig Point
Black Edge Summit Trig Point
Black Edge Summit Trig Point
Black Edge Summit Trig Point
Dove Holes from Black Edge
Hob Tor from Black Edge
Towards Chapel En Le Frith from Short Edge
Climber on Combs Edge with Combs Reservoir beyond
Climber on Combs Edge with Combs Reservoir beyond
Sheep near Combs Edge
Combs Reservoir from Combs Edges
Combs Valley from Combs Edges
Combs Edge with Kinder beyond
Zooming to Combs Reservoir
Combs Edge
Combs Edge with Shooting Hut
Looking out of small stone shelter next to Shooting Hut
Combs Valley from Shooting Hut
Shooting Hut
Combs Reservoir in far distance now
Looking towards Kinder
Broken wall along Combs Edge
Combs Reservoir from one of the many brooks flowing down from Combs Edge
Combs Valley with Kinder beyond
Another view towards Combs
Another view towards Combs
"Black & White Minstrel" Sheep
Combs Edge
Midshires Way looking north on my way back to Buxton

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